Lessons – Social Studies

Date: Tuesday October 7, 2008

Subject: Social Studies – Patriotism and the American Symbols

Objectives:

o    Learners will be better able to identify symbols of America (Generic Thinking/Living Skills) and explain how we can be patriotic (Mastery).

Time: 45 minutes

Materials:

·         White board and markers

·         Pictures of American symbols

·         Drawing paper

·         Crayons

Procedures:

·          Discuss the word “patriotism”

o   Loving your country and having pride for your country

o   KNOWING about your country

·          Talk about Symbols

o   What are some symbols that we know of…?

§  Stop sign

§  McDonalds

§  Red light

§  Recycle

§  Thumbs up

§  Math – tallies, money, straws, dollar and cent signs

§  Music notes

·          What are some things that are symbols for America/United States

o   Flag

o   Red white and blue

o   White house

o   President

o   Pledge of Allegiance

o   Capitol building

o   Washington DC

o   Uncle Sam

·         Student will return to seats and draw a picture of how they can be patriotic. It is not necessary to write sentences, just label pictures well.

 

Instructional Arrangement:

·         Students will be seated in the circle area so that they can easily see the white board.

·         Students will return to seats to draw the patriotic picture.

Evaluation:

·         I will know that Learners are better able to identify symbols of America when they can participate in a group discussion about symbols.

·         I will know that Learners are better able to explain how we can be patriotic when they can accurately draw a picture which shows one way that they can be patriotic.

 

 

 

Date: Thursday October 8, 2008

Subject: Social Studies: Voting

Objectives:

o   Learners will be better able to describe the voting process and why it is a fair way to make decisions (Generic Thinking/Living Skills) and compare the ways in which voting inside of our classroom is the same/different as voting in a US Election (Engagement).

Time: 1 hour

Materials:

·         Books about voting, by Dennis Fradin

·         Student offices for voting booths

·         Information about the “candidates”

·         Ballot box and pencils

·         Ballots

·         White board

·          

Procedures:

·          Class discussion about voting

o   What do we know about it?

o   What do we know about the Presidential Candidates?

o   In what ways do we vote as a class

·         Read some passages from the voting books to explain key terms such as ballots, ballot box, polling centers, candidates, etc.

·         Explain a class vote that we could do together.

·         Let’s vote! – explain the activity

·         Set up polling center, show ballots and ballot box, explain secret ballot.

·         Once everyone has voted, chart the ballots together on the white board.

·         Discuss in small table groups how this is the same/different than a real presidential election – tables will then share with the class what they came up with.

 

 

 

Instructional Arrangement:

·           Students will begin in the circle area for explanation and books

·         Students will move to their seats for the active voting activity, they will also be using the polling center at this time.

Evaluation:

·         I will know that Learners are better able to describe the voting process and why it is a fair way to make decisions when they can explain (in the next lesson) why this way of making decisions was fair.

·         I will know that Learners are better able to compare the ways in which voting inside of our classroom is the same/different as voting in a US Election when they can participate in a small group discussion about voting.

 

 

Date: Thursday October 9, 2008

Subject: Social Studies – The American Flag

Objectives:

o   Learners will be better able to name the flag as an American symbol and describe the flag and its symbolism (Mastery). Learners will be better able to describe the voting process and why it is a fair way to make decisions (Generic Thinking/Living Skills).

Time: 1 hour

Materials:

·         Snack Materials – Graham crackers, frosting, licorice and sprinkles, plates, napkins, spoons,

·         Flag handouts and crayons

·         The American Flag – book

·          

Procedures:

·          Read The American Flag

·          Talk about the flag

o   What are some things on our flag?

o   What does each thing mean/symbolize?

·         Rules of making a snack

o   No eating/licking your fingers

o   Listen to directions

·          Work together on snack project

o   Spread out the white frosting

o   Add the red licorice stripes

o   Teachers sprinkle blue

·          Eat snack

·         Make your own flag

o   Think about your favorite color

o   Your age is a special number

o   Name should be on it somewhere

·         Explain why voting was a fair way to make this decision – during snack and flag making teacher and paraprofessional will call students to explain why voting was a fair way to choose the activity.

 

Instructional Arrangement:

·         Students will begin the lesson in circle area for the reading and directions/rules.

·         Students will move to their seats for the remainder of the lesson (activity, make-your-own flag and one-on-one with teacher).

Evaluation:

·         I will know that Learners are better able to name the flag as an American symbol and describe the flag and its symbolism when they are able to put together the flag snack, naming the parts and explaining piece by piece its symbolism.

·         I will know that Learners are better able to describe the voting process and why it is a fair way to make decisions when students can explain to teacher/paraprofessional why we used voting for this activity.

 

 

Date: Thursday October 16, 2008

Subject: Social Studies – Statue of Liberty

Objectives:

o   Learners will be better able to identify the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of the USA and describe it (Generic Thinking/Living Skills).

Time: 1 hour

Materials:

·         Statue of Liberty craft activities:

o   head pieces,

o   spikes,

o   crayons

o   stapler

·         Book – Statue of Liberty

·         White board and markers

Procedures:

·         Start the lesson by collecting ideas about symbols of America.

·         Discuss what students already know about the Statue of Liberty and record on chart paper (TWL style)

·         Record some questions that students might have about the Statue of Liberty

·          Read aloud book to students – explaining difficult words along the way

·          Go back to chart and record what we learned from the book

o   Think of other ways that we could find out answers to our other questions

·          Craft – cut and color your crown, attach spikes

Instructional Arrangement:

·          Begin in circle activity

·         Move to desks to do craft

Evaluation:

·         I will know that Learners are better able to identify the Statue of Liberty as a symbol of the USA and describe it when they participate in the making of the chart about the Statue of Liberty.

 

 

 

Date: Thursday October 23, 2008

Subject: Guided Reading – Uncle Sam

Objectives:

o   Learners will be better able to identify Uncle Sam as a symbol of the USA and describe it (Generic Thinking/Living Skills).   

Time: 45 minutes

Materials:

·         Uncle Sam cutout – Nonfiction Literacy-Building Booklets & Activities (p53)

·         Crayons

·         Scissors

·         Brass Fasteners

·         Glue

·         White board and markers

·         Uncle Sam poems “I’m Uncle Sam – that’s me!”

Procedures:

·          Before:

o   Ask students what they know about Uncle Sam and make a chart on the white board

o   Offer more facts about Uncle Sam and explain the story of how he began.

·         During:

o   Teacher read aloud and explains difficult words

o   Echo read

o   Choral read if possible

·          After:

o   Color the patterns red, white, and blue

o   Cut out all patterns

o   Use brads to attach arms and legs to body

o   Write name on the back

Instructional Arrangement:

·          Students will begin the lesson in the circle area and move to their seats for the craft section.

Evaluation:

·         I will know that Learners will be better able to identify Uncle Sam as a symbol of the USA and describe it when they include him in a discussion about American Symbols in the social studies lesson later today.

 

 

Date: Monday October 27, 2008

Subject: Social Studies – Review

Objectives:

·         All objectives of this unit apply to this lesson.

Time: 45 minutes

Materials:

·         Review handout

·         Chart on the white board (T against Students) with markers

Procedures:

·          Explain the idea of a test review to students

o   Each student gets one question, if answered correctly “students” gets a tally, if incorrectly T gets a tally

o   If student answers correctly, student stands up and does either 1 frog jump or five jumping jacks (teacher’s choice)

o   If students are being disrespectful and talking when it is not their turn T gets a tally

·          Ask if students didn’t understand any question asked during review, or have any other questions

·          

Instructional Arrangement:

·           Students will be seated either in seats or circle area; wherever teacher feels she/he has best control and can captivate attention.

Evaluation:

·         I will know that Learners will be better able to meet all unit objectives when the review questions are answered correctly.

  

 

Review Handout:

 

1.     Your mother or grandma tells you to go to bed. Is this power with authority or power without authority?

2.    Name one symbol of the USA and tell me one fact or detail about it.

3.    You have the right or responsibility to go to any church that you want to in America.

4.    What is one way you can be a good citizen?

5.    If a bully tells you to give him your lunch money, he has power with authority or power without authority?

6.    Draw a chart on the board voting between playing on the swings or the slide.  How many votes for the swings? How many for the slide?

7.    Which activity won? How do you know?

8.    Why do we follow rules at school? (one answer)

a.    So we can learn

b.    So we can play

c.    So we can be the boss

d.    So we can be safe

9.    What is another reason why we follow rules at school?

10. What is one American symbol? Give me one fact or detail about it.

11.  If a teacher asks you to sit “criss-cross applesauce” does she have the power with authority or power without authority?

12. You have the right or responsibility to take care of your materials at school.

13. How can you be a good citizen?

14. Is it your right or responsibility to stay in line in the hallway?

15. Wearing a t-shirt with a flag is being a good citizen or being patriotic?

16. Is it your right or responsibility to have your own desk at school?

17. Make a chart about favorite colors, red, blue and yellow. Which color is the most favorite in this class?

18. Which is the least favorite?

 

 


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